Why Stress Can Actually Kill You

Infographic from Stress.org “Stress Is Killing You”

Chronic stress is serious business.  According to stress.org, “Stress is the basic cause of 60% of all human illness and disease.”  For some, prolonged, elevated levels of stress may even prove life threatening.

When our body senses danger, real or imagined, it sends out various elevated levels of hormones that make the heart beat faster, increase blood pressure, slow down the digestive system, etc, to “protect” itself.  While in the short term, our bodies can typically handle the onslaught of “stress hormones,” over time it can damage any of the body’s delicate systems.

Research has suggested that when the heart is continually “under stress,” it can cause inflammation in the coronary arteries, which, some believe, can lead to a heart attack.

Stress increases the risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke by an average of 38%.[Source: http://www.stress.org] Continue reading

Advertisements

Is Your Job A Pain In The Neck…Literally?

The workplace can be a major contributor to muscular aches and pains, affecting job performance and decreasing overall productivity.  A 2010 The Bureau of Labor Statistics report states over 346,000 cases of musculoskeletal disorders exist, causing an average of 11 missed workdays per person.  

On site chair massage is an effective employee perk many companies provide to counter workday aches and pains. Continue reading

Can Chair Massage Make You Smarter?

English: Albert Einstein Français : portrait d...

English: Albert Einstein Français : portrait d’Albert Einstein (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While it may not turn you into a regular Einstein, research shows chair massage may improve brain function.

There’s no doubt that workplace demands on employees are greater than ever.  One survey shows that “eight out of 10 respondents report that managers’ and employees’ workloads have increased, along with employee stress. At the same time, half of respondents report that employee motivation, energy, and endurance have all decreased.”

It turns out that increased levels in stress hormones – such as cortisol – adversely affect specific tasks involved in memory processing (Howe, 1998). In large amounts, cortisol can actually slow neuron growth, development and function (McEwen, 1999; Lombroso, 1998).

Research suggests that massage not only relaxes and calms the mind, but actually improves performance. Continue reading